The Rambler

Dress Code Drama

ES, Journalist

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Here at RMS, some students have been upset at the current dress code policies. The most recent dress codes have been holes above fingertips, showing of bra straps, and showing cleavage. Many students have a negative opinion about the dress code and believe it is a real issue.

A student says, “The dress code is stupid, unreasonable, and not fair to girls. We should be able to wear what we want!” says Carnella Frazier in 5th grade.

While the dress code is focused mainly on girls, what do the boys have to say about it?

“I haven’t gone through much but people get pulled out of class all the time and yelled at for what they wear that day,” says Titan Jones in 8th grade. “It doesn’t really matter if I see it in school because I see it outside of school all the time.” Titan says it does not distract him, no matter if it’s skin above the finger tips, or if it’s shoulders. Titan says as long as it is not showing too much skin in certain areas, then it’s fine in his opinion.

Each student has a different view of the dress code. The girls think it is unfair, while the boys are not bothered with it but notice the frequency of the dress code violations.

Another girl, Meghan Bowers in the 8th grade, says, “The teachers and some students focus more on what you’re wearing than our education. They need to stop disrupting class to distract us from our work because they say it is distracting to the other students when the only ones it is distracting to people being dress coded.”

Mr. Bruce Lay, Executive Director of School Leadership for Oak Ridge Schools, shed some light on the situation from an administrator’s perspective. “The handbook does use the term mid-thigh as the proper length for shorts or skirts.  Many building administrators simply find it easier to use the below the fingertip rule to enforce appropriate length for clothing.”

New RMS Vice Principal Dr. Tonya Childress also had something to say, “Because people had been asking questions, I checked the percentage of the people that get dress coded and found that there is no discrimination against people here.”

Everyone, including students and staff, have an opinion on the dress code. While the staff may agree on the policies and enforce them, many students don’t like it and wish it would change. Whether or not the policies are changed, some people affected by the situation will still be upset.

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Dress Code Drama